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On a Miserable Monday

Hey hey!

It’s been quite some time since my last blog entry. I’m disappointed I haven’t been able to post regularly on this blog. Reason being my internet has been up and down lately due to some unknown factor, so I have my best detectives working on it! Yep, you heard right…Sherlock and Watson are now working for me.

Awaiting the results for any exam is torture but waiting for the shorthand exam result is much worse. I’m hoping they will be up on e-vision in a few weeks. Fingers crossed! I pass, though I feel I messed up the exam big time. Shorthand has always been tough for me and the exam has made me realise that I am not fast as I thought I was and this has effected my confidence in some way. The book which helped me through was Teeline for Journalists by Dawn Johnston although I have read great reviews on the book NCTJ Teeline Gold Standard for Journalists by Marie Cartwright. So will let everyone know how I did and hopefully won’t need to resit the dreaded exam in July!

I am currently working on a couple of ideas for my next pieces, alongside I’m also searching for a work placement for over summer. I have had some experience in working at a magazine before, which is why I’m still holding out for newspapers. It’s such a pity that The Evening Telegraph in Peterborough turned from a daily to a weekly newspaper, would’ve loved to have done some work experience there.

Anyways my new motto which I am following right now is: I don’t stop when I’m tired, I stop when I’m done.

Najmah

Profile, Uncategorized

Interview with ‘Head Honcho’ Heidi Semple

‘Work Hard, Play Hard’ – Heidi Semple

Heidi Semple’s job demands that she spent a lot of her time on the phone or on her laptop typing away.

The 45-year-old Market Deeping resident is the Managing Director of Scene Marketing Ltd and founder of Scene Publications. She launched the Scene magazines in 2007 with just one Deeping-based magazine. Today she has added five successful titles to the Scene portfolio.

Heidi has accomplished quite a lot in a short amount of time. So for her, running a magazine is not difficult.

Her first job was working as a Pharmacist Assistant. She does not have a degree just the usual O-Levels.

Once she began her career in publishing, she became hooked,

“It just got into my blood really, because once you understand it; it is such a fast pace,” said Heidi. “Every day is different, you never know what you are going to be working on. It is being proactive, imaginative and I quite enjoy that.”

At Emap, she started at the bottom as a telesales person and came through the ranks. Over the years, she relished the changes. Heidi spoke about how frustrating it became working for a big company.

“It took ages for a decision to be made. We had a meeting about a meeting, back-to-back all day,” she said.

However with Emap being taken over by Bauer Media, she began looking at other options and working for herself sounded like a better idea.

She initially got the idea whilst working with a colleague who also embarked on doing something similar elsewhere.

“It was meeting and talking to people that I realised there was a huge need for community information,” she said. “Nobody knew what was going on in their community and I was able to deliver that kind of news with the Scene.”

So that is how the Scene magazine was born.

“Now I work harder than I did before that it doesn’t feel like work.”

Kimberley Evans, fellow colleague and Advertising Executive at Scene Publications agrees, “Heidi knows her stuff, she is very proactive and a very likeable person.”

With multi-media journalism coming in, Heidi said it hasn’t had much impact on the magazines they do.
“We have multi-media, we can view our magazines online, they are interactive and we have to go more and more down that route,” She said.

Her training from Emap comes into good use at Scene when dealing, managing people and deadlines.

Heidi said, “Emap were very good with their training and I took every opportunity I got. So in that sense I know how to deal with people and hopefully know how to get the best out of them.”

Heidi has a wide range of skills but would like to add more to her repertoire. She wants to experiment with having a magazine that would be placed on a newsstand and which is a paid for publication.

“I have worked on national magazines but only one element of it. So as much as I had editorial, marketing and even subscription experience to a degree, actual paid-for distribution I don’t have experience of,” she said.

Any advice?

“You got to be so imaginative and you have to be more creative as it is more accessible now.”

To read more on Scene, visit magazine website: http://thescenemagazine.co.uk/

Follow them on Twitter: @yourlocalscene

Like their Facebook page: City Scene Magazine

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A Wannabe Hack

Hello!

Technically this should have been my introductory post, but my online journalism module needed a blog entry. So that’s where the Charles Dickens entry fits in, oh well. So here goes! My name is Najmah. I’m currently studying journalism at Anglia Ruskin University.

So how did I get into journalism? Well, when I was younger, apart from playing with dolls I was always reading and writing but I never had a lifelong ambition of becoming a journalist. So I had the moment of clarity when I was 21, stuck looking for a job in business administration, I realised that I needed a career change. So here I am four years later. I hear/read everywhere how hard it is to get into journalism. A month ago I attended the ‘So You Want To Be A Journalist’ conference in London. In which, the only advice I heard from other journalists was start a blog and make a brand of yourself, although I was a little sceptical of this at first, then I thought why not give it a try – I have nothing to lose.

This blog is basically for me to showcase my skills, and as I have an interest in everything you’ll see me writing just about anything, or me wishing I could. Though I’m still finding a niche to write about. I’m still gaining confidence in writing blogs, so I hope you like what I write and let me know what you think.

Najmah

Novelisation, University

Charles Dickens Bicentennial

It was Charles Dickens 200th anniversary earlier this year. His 200th anniversary was celebrated worldwide on 7 February 2012. I think he is one of the most phenomenal novelists in the history of English writing.

Charles Dickens is one of many authors, like William Shakespeare, whose literature is used in schools for GCSE’s/A Level English literature exams and coursework in which the students analyse his writing style. When I was at school, analysing the writing of Charles Dickens in English GCSE was really interesting for me because,

1) I am an avid reader, and
2) He started off as a journalist too.

So the writing being in old English didn’t matter to me.

One of my favourite books was Great Expectations; many themes are explored within this book. Hopes and dreams are the two important themes. Charles Dickens shows the growth and development of an orphan named Pip who has a dream of reaching the stars and becoming a gentleman. Unfortunately, his dreams are not fulfilled. The themes are portrayed in a way that makes everyone sympathise with the characters. For me he still is a fine novelist and if he were here today, I would be honoured to meet him.

The younger generation of today are beginning to read ebooks. Ebooks are a digital form of books, which can be read on a variety of e-readers. Amazon Kindle, Kobo, Apple iPad and various other tablets are available which allow ebooks to be easily downloaded or to be bought online. These include many novels by Charles Dickens. Several novels including novels by Charles Dickens are available free to download, this acts as an encouragement for people to read.